Art is existing in a continuous paradox. The economy around it wants it to function economically; that is, in optimally clearly formatted and manageable ways. Its original drive is opposite to that; art finds its source and vitality in complexity, intensity and high specificity. That is why I have high hopes for an initiative like the Multitude Art Prize, which wants to focus and create a setting in which art is presented on a trajectory that is essentially a quest for meaning."
Bart De Baere, Directeur, Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen (M HKA)

SUBSCRIBE!

Sign up for our newsletters and get access to exclusive content and news. No spam!

Museum of Modern Art, Antwerp

The Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen (M HKA) is one of the eight large cultural institutions of the Flemish Community. It combines the functions of an international contemporary art museum with those of a film museum, except for the archival role of the latter. It owns a collection of pre cinema and cinema hardware in addition to its art collection. This art collection starts with the mid 1960s happenings as realised in Antwerp by Panamarenko, who donated his house and the assets in it to the museum. M HKA wants its collection to respond to the present reality of a globalised multipolar world. It feels its core role to be the proposal into public domain of a hypothesis on contemporary art and its possible relations to urgencies in society. In order to do so it reorganised itself and thinks of the collection as ABCD (archives, library (bibliotheek), collection and documentation) but feels that any of its activities remakes this body of the collection as a proposal of art within society.

M HKA will develop a specific reflection which enhances the overall project by hosting and publicly presenting the Július Koller archive and by relating this archive to its own reflections on the archive as a collection.


“Art is existing in a continuous paradox. The economy around it wants it to function economically; that is, in optimally clearly formatted and manageable ways. Its original drive is opposite to that; art finds its source and vitality in complexity, intensity and high specificity. That is why I have high hopes for an initiative like the Multitude Art Prize, which wants to focus and create a setting in which art is presented on a trajectory that is essentially a quest for meaning.”

Bart De Baere, Director